Skip to main content

Good Practice

Information about good practice, including MoneySense, Mentally Healthy Schools and SEND Mediation. 

SENCO Forum- new platform

The SENCO Forum logo

The SENCO Forum is an independent e-community for Special Educational Needs Coordinators and others who are involved in the education of pupils with special educational needs and disabilities. 

With a current membership of over 2,500, the Forum is committed to offering a solution-focused, collaborative and mutually supportive resource. Members can use the Forum to raise issues important to them and share information. 

An Advisory Group supports the Forum. This group’s function is:

  • to monitor the operation and membership of the Forum;
  • to ensure that message content is of use to SENCOs, and
  • to ensure that the Acceptable Use Policy is observed.

The Group has a rotating three-year membership, currently consisting of 3 primary SENCOs; 3 secondary SENCOs; 3 advisory/support staff; 2 trainers; a representative of the Department for Education and an independent chair. The Forum was hosted by the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA) from 1996, and then supported (from 2010) by the DfE. From April 2018 the Forum continues to operate independently, in partnership with NASEN, with indirect support from the Department of Education.

Instructions:

  • Visit the SEND Gateway website  
  • The SENCO Forum logo tile will takes you to a page with some information about the Forum and a link to access it.
  • Sign up to the Forum.  Once approved, you will be able to start using it straight away.

Childhood acquired brain injury: the hidden disability

A quick guide to understanding and supporting children with acquired brain injury.

Childhood Acquired Brain Injury: The hidden disability

 

 

New e-learning course - developing Education Health and Care Plans from Year 9 and beyond

The Council for Disabled Children has produced some new e-learning, designed to support those involved in developing education, health and care (EHC) plans for young people from year 9 and beyond.

It is based on learning from the two resources created as part of the Independent Support programme which you can download here. The examples should be useful to those contributing to EHC needs assessments and to those writing plans as well as to parents, children and young people and those supporting them. Although there will be some key features that will apply to EHC plans for children and young people of all ages, this module focuses on the different considerations for young people aged 14-25.

The documents were first produced in response to feedback from the sector, building on the initial resource with a particular focus on how plans should evolve for young people from year 9 reviews onwards, as their journey into adulthood builds momentum. We would recommend that you use this resource, and the documents to complement the first guide.

The development of the e-learning highlights CDC's continued committment to supporting disabled children and young people, and those with special educational needs (SEN) in their transition to adulthood. For parents and carers interested in how EHC plans are designed and processed, and their children's rights and entitlements, we would also recommend our Case Law Directory, written up from tribunal judgements by barrister Steve Broach from Monckton Chambers

MoneySense - Making sense of money

MoneySense is a free and impartial financial education programme from NatWest which provides everything you need to make teaching 5-18 year-olds about money feel real, fun and relevant to their lives. Registering for MoneySense provides access to nasen accredited SEN resources, including lesson plans, presentations, activity sheets and interactive activities which bring important money-related topics to life.

Join over 15,500 teachers using the free, curriculum-linked resources to teach 5-18 year-olds. Our free workshops are supported by over 5,000 bank volunteers.

Mentally Healthy Schools

Mentally Healthy Schools is a new website to help primary school staff support the mental health of pupils.  There is a range of expert and practical information and resources to help all primary school staff understand, promote and deal confidently with children’s mental health issues: jargon-free information on what can undermine and what can help emotional wellbeing; tips and strategies to help; and specific advice on vulnerable groups.

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

New regulations come into force in May 2018 that will affect the way schools manage data. 

In May, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and UK Data Protection Bill will bring about changes to UK data protection law.

The changes will mean that many schools, academies and multi-academy trusts will have to review the ways in which they handle data, manage information, and communicate about data usage with parents and children.

To support schools to comply with the new regulations, we have produced a series of resources to explain what the new regulations will mean, to help schools review and improve their data handling.

This includes a video on YouTube and a series of blogs that explain what the changes mean, and share some practical examples of how schools can review their existing data arrangements.

'Working Together on Workload' Video

In partnership with Ofsted and other leading education figures, we have have produced a new 'myth busting' video on teacher workload.

The video, which features the Education Secretary and the Ofsted Chief Inspector, sets out the steps being taken to help reduce the workload of schools and teachers.

It also includes some useful tips to challenge common misconceptions of what the Department for Education and Ofsted inspectors do and do not expect schools to be doing.

The video is available to watch on YouTube

'What works' resource for working with pupils and teachers with SEN

AN interactive ‘what works’ resource for those working with pupils and students with SEN is available..

The resource – ‘SEN support: research evidence on effective approaches and examples of current practice in good and outstanding schools and colleges’ – provides school and college leaders, teachers and practitioners with information and evidence-based practice that can be effective for SEN support. 

School and colleges leadership teams, SENCOs and classroom teachers are encouraged to review their provision against the seven key features of effective support.  Practitioners can look at the detail of interventions and approaches and consider what would be most beneficial for meeting the needs of children and young people with special educational needs in their settings.  

Both the development of the resource and the underpinning research were undertaken by ASK Research and Coventry University. The resource is hosted on nasen’s SEND Gateway and the Education & Training Foundation Excellence Gateway

Examples of effective practice include:

  • Reorganising lesson structure, learning environments and curriculum

  • Measures to address attendance issues

  • Effective transition support and preparation for adulthood

  • Effective progress monitoring

AN interactive ‘what works’ resource for those working with pupils and students with SEN is available..

 

The resource – ‘SEN support: research evidence on effective approaches and examples of current practice in good and outstanding schools and colleges’ – provides school and college leaders, teachers and practitioners with information and evidence-based practice that can be effective for SEN support.

 

School and colleges leadership teams, SENCOs and classroom teachers are encouraged to review their provision against the seven key features of effective support.  Practitioners can look at the detail of interventions and approaches and consider what would be most beneficial for meeting the needs of children and young people with special educational needs in their settings. 

 

Both the development of the resource and the underpinning research were  undertaken by ASK Research and Coventry University.  The resource is hosted on  nasen’s SEND Gateway and the Education & Training Foundation Excellence Gateway

 

Examples of effective practice include:

 

·         Reorganising lesson structure, learning environments and curriculum

·         Measures to address attendance issues

·         Effective transition support and preparation for adulthood

·         Effective progress monitoring

Help your autistic students with MyWorld

If you are a teacher or education professional, sign up to our MyWorld campaign now to get free information and resources straight to your inbox every fortnight. The campaign is designed to help teachers and other education professionals support pupils on the autism spectrum in schools, by providing access to the best free resources and information.

You can access archived MyWorld emails and see how you can support your autistic students in different areas of school life.

Disability Matters

Disability Matters is a free e-learning resource for the UK workforce. It is a flexible learning resource to help those who work, volunteer or engage with disabled children and young people (from 0 to 25 years) and their families to support them as effectively as they can.

It consists of three programmes:

  • Disability Matters: all Disability Matters e-learning sessions

  • Disability Matters Learning Packages: e-learning sessions that have been grouped together to meet particular learning needs

  • Disability Matters Resources: Face-to-face training resource packs

E-Learning Resources

MindEd is a free educational resource on children and young people's mental health for all adults.

Too much information campaign

National Autistic Society - More than 1 in 100 people are on the autism spectrum - that’s around 700,000 people in the UK. Being autistic means seeing, hearing and feeling the world in a different, often more intense way to other people. Autistic people often find social situations difficult and may struggle to filter out the sounds, smells, sights and information they experience, which can leave them feeling overwhelmed, particularly in busy public places.

The National Autistic Society have released a film - Too Much Information campaign, which focuses on the impact unexpected changes can have on autistic people.

Back to top